GEO399 GEOLOGY OF THE NATIONAL PARKS             Spring 2002

Westminster College

SYLLABUS

 

Instructor:       Dr. Alan Goldin;  Room: CSC106B

             Office hours: MWF 10 A.M., H 11 A.M.      

            Phone: 592-5015 (goldina@jaynet.wcmo.edu)

Class:       T 10:45 A.M. CSC105

                  

--> COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Hands-on opportunity to learn geology field techniques, do a cooperative organization planning effort, and to study on-site the national parks of the United States.  Following a preparatory spring seminar, The three-week Summer Session course, will be taught on an off-campus field trip in the United States.  Some of the study will be led by federal and state personnel.  The geology at individual parks will be studied as well as the regional geology.

 

 

--> DATES OF TRAVEL:

Leave Monday May 6, 8 A.M., return Thursday May 23, 7 P.M.  Rise and shine about 6:30 A.M. and leave camp about 8.  Days should end about 6 or 7 P.M.  We will camp each night; only a few of the campsites will be pre-arranged.  Dinners will be prepared at the campsite by rotating groups of students.

 

 

--> COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

The geographic distribution of the national parks and monuments will be divided among pairs of students.  The four states we will concentrate on (Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico) will be split among the four pairs of students. Each pair of students will take about 4 to 6 national parks and/or monuments within their state, contact the parks and make arrangements for park personnel or others to lead us in the park.  They will also be responsible for obtaining maps and field guides, studying the geology and history of the area, and leading discussions on nearby areas outside the park as well as interesting areas between the parks.  Students will be responsible for all scientific and logistical arrangements, for leading the tours in their areas, and presenting their findings to the class during spring semester and on the field trip.  The presentations will occur in April.  Time for the presentations will be about a half hour.  During the week following each presentation all students will be tested on the material presented.  The pair making the presentation will also hand in a written report for the other students to follow the presentation as well as to be the field guide for the summer trip.  Each student in the pair will be responsible for his/her own part of the presentation, such as a different part of the state or different park, or different subject area, i.e. history versus geology versus recreation.  Students will be responsible for arranging speakers as well as other learning experiences, such as raft trips, hiking expeditions, etc.  Students will keep a journal, providing insightful analysis of observations.  They will incorporate observations, textbooks and field people.  Interpretation, integration, and comparison of observations and research are the keys to a quality journal.  A daily "play-by-play" is not what is expected, nor is merely a description of events.  All students older than 21 will be expected to share the driving on the summer trip.

     

 

--> GRADE DETERMINATION FOR SPRING COURSE:

      Field trip organization:                       40%

      Presentation of national parks/monuments   40%

      Quizzes on presentations                       20%

 

--> GRADE DETERMINATION FOR SUMMER COURSE:

      Field trip leadership for assigned parks       40%

      Field trip participation                       40%

      Journal                                   20%

            Journals are due May 24

 

 


GEO320 - GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHWEST NATIONAL PARKS  Spring 2003

Westminster College

SYLLABUS

 

Instructor:       Dr. Alan Goldin; Room: CSC106B

             Office hours: MWF 10 A.M., H 1 P.M.      

            Phone: 592-5015 (goldina@jaynet.wcmo.edu)    

            

--> COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

Hands-on opportunity to learn geology field techniques, do a cooperative organization planning effort, and to study on-site the geology, natural science, and natural history of the national parks in the U.S. and Canadian Rockies and NW United States and SW Canada.  The two-week Summer Session course will be taught as an off-campus field trip in the United States and Canada.  Some of the field trip will be led by federal and state personnel.  The geology, history, and human impacts on the environment will be studied in the parks as well as regionally.

 

--> DATES OF TRAVEL:

14 to 17 days within the period August 1 to August 21, 2003.  Students must make their own arrangements to arrive at the starting point in Seattle on time.  The trip will end in Seattle or Grand Teton National Park on August 21.  These starting and ending dates and locations are tentative.  Rise and shine about 6:30 A.M. and leave camp about 8 A.M.  Days should end we will be in camp about 6 or 7 P.M.  We will camp each night.  Only a few of the campsites will be pre-arranged.  Chores, such as cooking, clean-up, packing the vans, and so forth will be rotated fairly during the trip.  Each night we will have a 15 to 30 minute review of the day and preparation for the next day.

 

-> COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

The geographic distribution of the national parks and monuments will be divided among pairs of students.  The first approximation for potential parks and monuments are the following:

      Grand Teton National Park

      Yellowstone National Park

      Waterton-Glacier National Parks

      Kananaskis Provincial Park

      Banff National Park

      Jasper National Park

      Yoho National Park

      Mount Robson Provincial Park

      Glacier (Canada) National Park

Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park

Mount Revelstoke National Park

      Bugaboo Provincial Park

      Kokanee Glacier Provincial  Park

      Mount Rainier National Park

      Olympic National Park

      Other possibilities: North Cascades, Crater Lake, Craters of the Moon

 

      Each pair of students will take two or three parks, contact the parks and make arrangements for park personnel or others to lead us in the park.  They will also be responsible for obtaining maps and field guides, studying the geology and history of the area, and leading discussions on nearby areas outside the park as well as interesting areas between the parks.  Students will be responsible for all scientific and logistical arrangements, for leading the tours in their areas, and presenting their findings to the class during spring semester and on the field trip.  The presentations will occur in April.  Time for the presentations will be 30 to 45 minutes.  During the week following each presentation all students will be tested on the material presented.  The pair making the presentation will also hand in a written report one week before their presentation for the other students to follow the presentation.  Because of their new-found expertise, students will be the field guides for their respective areas for the summer trip.  Each student in the pair will be responsible for his/her own part of the presentation, such as a different part of the state or different park, or different subject area, i.e. history versus geology versus recreation.  Students will be responsible for arranging speakers as well as other learning experiences, such as raft trips, hiking expeditions, etc. 

 

A quiz on the geographical features of the region will be given in late March or early April.  It will include important rivers, lakes, mountains, cities, and so forth in the region.  A list will be provided.

 

A five-to-ten page paper on a geological/environmental/historical topic related to the trip is required.  It can be about the geology, historical settlement, historical founding of the national parks in the two countries, human impacts on the national parks, and the like.

 

Students will keep a journal, providing insightful analysis of observations.  They will incorporate observations, textbooks and field people.  Interpretation, integration, and comparison of observations and research are the keys to a quality journal.  A daily "play-by-play" is not what is expected, nor is merely a description of events. 

 

-> TEXTBOOKS ON RESERVE:

 

Ashbaugh, J.G. 1994. Pacific Northwest: Geographic Perspectives. Kendall Hunt Publishers.

 

Harris,A.G., E. Tuttle, and S.D. Tuttle.  1997. Geology of the National Parks, Kendall-Hunt Publications.

 

Kiver, E.P. and D.V. Harris. 1999. Geology of U.S. Parklands. John Wiley and Sons.

 

Various authors. Roadside Geology series. Mountain Press Publishing Company.

 

 

 

--> GRADE DETERMINATION FOR SPRING SEMESTER:

 

Field trip organization and participation:                15%

Map Quiz on geographic features in the trip area  20%

Paper                                           20%

Presentation                                          20%

Quizzes on the presentations                       15%

Attendance                                      10%

 

 

--> GRADE DETERMINATION FOR SUMMER COURSE:

 

     Field trip leadership for assigned parks 40%

     Field trip participation                       40%

     Journal of synthesis and analysis            20%

      Journals are due September 1